Private housing

VAULT HOUSE

JOHNSTON MARKLEE


VAULT HOUSE

JOHNSTON MARKLEEarchmarathonJOHNSTON MARKLEE
1545 Pontius Avenue
CA 90025 Los Angeles, USA
www.johnstonmarklee.com
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
VAULT HOUSE
Location:
Oxnard, California
Year:
2013

Situated in a densely developed beach site in Southern California, the Vault House challenges the typology commonly found on narrow oceanfront lots.
Instead of directing its focus on the single prime ocean view, an array of transparent interior spaces layered inside the main volume, offer a multiplicity of oblique views through the house while capturing natural light from a variety of angles. With the assembly of stacked and unidirectional vaulted rooms contained within a simple rectilinear volume, the parallel orientation of the rooms acts as a filter that extends the oceanfront view from the beachfront façade to the West through to the street at the Eastern boundary of the site.
The house was designed under the restrictions imposed by the California Coastal Commission, which require the main living area to be lifted two meters off the sand, allowing for possible tsunami waves to pass beneath the house.


HOUSE IN THE WOOD

WILLIAM REUE


HOUSE IN THE WOOD

WILLIAM REUEarchmarathonWILLIAM REUE
1123 Broadway Suite 904
New York, NY 10010, USA
www.wreue.com
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
HOUSE IN THE WOOD
Location:
Ulster County, NY, USA
Year:
2013

A House in the Woods is a single-family home located on a densely forested 8.5 acre lot at the base of the Shawangunk Mountains in upstate New York. The 4800 SQFT residence is the result of the studied relationship between two opposing geometries – a long sculptural wall clad in Cor-Ten weathering steel and a mass of stratified bluestone that appears to have emerged from the boulder-strewn earth. Locally-sourced materials and strategic siting stitch the house into the natural world while contributing to its sustainability for the modern one.
The design for A House in the Woods was grounded in the owner’s desire to build an artful home that responded to her values of order, beauty, and environmental stewardship.
The structure’s uncomplicated geometry is enriched by the boldness of its materials, resulting in a balanced composition that is both sensuous and refined. The house is a personal refuge that takes its design cues from the colors and textures of the natural landscape.


RE-WRAPPED HOUSE

A D LAB


RE-WRAPPED HOUSE

A D LABarchmarathonA D LAB
229 Joo Chiat Road
#02-01, Singapore 427489
www.a-dlab.com
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
RE-WRAPPED HOUSE
Location:
Singapore
Year:
2013

This quiet low-rise cul-de-sac of semi detached houses at Jalan Binchang is similar to many in Singapore. Constructed mostly in the 1970’s, the pairs of two storey brick houses are now at the stage in their building lifespan where renovation is eminent.
The designers saw the development of the quaint neighborhood and its natural evolution as a main source of inspiration in the design of no. 67 Jalan Binchang. They brainstormed on how to enlarge and rejuvenate the existing semi detached house while maintaining a harmony with the existing built environment, the history of tropical residential buildings and with the natural environment.
The designers looked at the existing building as one would study a living organism that needed to adapt to a new environment. Instead of demolishing its embedded history and reinventing it as something completely new, they decided to use its structure, its internal logic of organization and meaning as a starting point to the design, and to build upon this pre-existing pattern and structure to evolve it into a new form and space.
The architects find it important to study how space can evolve with time and with the changing conditions of the inhabitants so that the lifespan of construction can be increased. Also as a way of reducing waste, savings cost on the project, and minimizing disruption to the neighbor’s house, the designers decided to retain the entire 2-storey semi detached house on the site.


TRESARCA

ASSEMBLAGE


TRESARCA

ASSEMBLAGEarchmarathonASSEMBLAGE
817 South Main Street Ste. 200
Las Vegas, NV 89101, Stati Uniti
www.assemblagestudio.com
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
TRESARCA
Location:
Las Vegas, NV, USA
Year:
2011

At Tresarca, the materials develop a layering of mass as you move from the basement to the private realm. Each layer is representational of the stratification of the nearby Red Rock Mountains. Change of materials provides the variety of textures associated with the rock formations.
Crevices between the masses form an oasis where landscape and water cool the space.
The mesh screen provides both a protection from the harsh sun on the interior spaces and a play of shadows among the forms. Blurring of the line between inside and out has been established throughout this home.
Space is not determined by the enclosure but through the idea of space extending past perceived barriers into an expanded form of living indoors and out. Even in this harsh environment, one is able to enjoy this concept through the development of exterior courts which are designed to shade and protect. Reminiscent of the crevices found in our rock formations where one often finds an oasis of life in this environment.


ARTIST RESIDENCE AND ATELIER

MODUS ARCHITECTS

Photos courtesy of Hannes Meraner, Martina Hunglinger, Niccolò M. Gandolfi

ARTIST RESIDENCE AND ATELIER

MODUS ARCHITECTSarchmarathonMODUS ARCHITECTS
Fallmerayerstrasse 7
39042 Brixen, Italia
www.modusarchitects.com
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
ARTIST RESIDENCE AND ATELIER
Location:
Castelrotto, Bolzano, Italy
Year:
2012

Perched atop a ridge on the outskirts of the historic city-center, the house splits into two interlocking volumes to open up and look out over the valley of the South Tyrolean town of Castelrotto. A bifurcated concrete plinth negotiates the sloping site from which the twin wooden elements rise up on a stilted timber structure to free up the view across the site at the ground level. Tightly wedged between the house that the artist Hubert Kostner grew up in and a neighboring traditional house, the constricted site prompted a more vertical solution where the roof plays a dominant role.
Joined together at the hip with a spiral staircase, the constituent programs of the atelier and the house pivot outwards and elbow their way into one volume or the other like two cantankerous siblings. The work spaces of the artist’s studio, along with a small gallery, are located in the basement level and are accessed by a ramp to facilitate the loading and unloading of unwieldy materials and artwork. One of the work spaces is a double-height, north facing studio with an even, indirect sunlight ideal for artistic production.
In building a house and atelier for the artist in his touristic yet scenic hometown, Kostner persistently engaged us in a bantering dialogue of irony between tradition and tourism, structure and ornament, that which is necessary and that which is not—to name but a few—while demanding that we hold steadfast an expression of architecture where no detail was left unturned, where everything was neither standard nor frivolously custom made. This way of working applied not only to the scale of the building, but also to the scale of all the things, objects, and surfaces within the building. For example, while much of the cabinetry and furniture is made specific for the project, an eye for simple but surprising solutions along with a limited budget kept the design process in check.