Sport

TIMBER STRUCTURE

FT ARCHITECTS

Photos courtesy of Shigeo Ogawa

TIMBER STRUCTURE

FT ARCHITECTSarchmarathonFT ARCHITECTS
5-22-3-305 Komazawa Setagaya-ku Tokyo, Japan
fta.gotohp.jp
Category:
Sport
Project selected:
TIMBER STRUCTURE
Location:
Tokyo, Japan
Year:
2013

The project consists of two buildings, an archery hall and a boxing club, standing a few hundred meters apart on the grounds of Kogakuin University in west Tokyo.
The University’s brief was for low-cost structures made of locally sourced timber to provide accessible and inspiring spaces for the students. By chance, both facilities called for a column-free space of 7.2m by 10.8m, a size that is comparable to a sacred hall in a traditional Japanese temple. In order to achieve this span, without columns and using low-cost methods of timber construction, it was necessary to come up with an innovative timber solution. We began the project by investigating a number of structural forms that would be appropriate for each sport.
Small timber sections, normally reserved for furniture making, were chosen for the archery hall, and timber members deemed defected because of insect damage, for the boxing club.
We have salvaged the purity of traditional Japanese timber composition, simply made up of horizontals and verticals, which has been somewhat disregarded ever since the advent of modernism in Japan.
The two structures have been constructed employing a simple, lo-tech method of bolt-and-nut assembly. However, due to the scale of the space and simplicity of construction, the execution had to be meticulous, in order to produce spaces that are out of the ordinary.


LONDON VELODROME

HOPKINS ARCHITECTS

Photos courtesy of Richard Davies, Tom Jenkin, Anthony Palmer, Nathaniel Moore, Edmund Sumner, Olympic Delivery Authority, Janie Airey, Astrid Eckert

LONDON VELODROME

HOPKINS ARCHITECTSarchmarathonHOPKINS ARCHITECTS
27 Broadley Terrace
London NW1 6LG, England
www.hopkins.co.uk
Category:
Sport
Project selected:
LONDON VELODROME
Location:
London, England
Year:
2012

The 21,700m² Velodrome was inspired by the activity which takes place within its walls; from the beginning of the project Hopkins Architects wanted to apply the same level of design creativity and rigor of engineering that goes into a bicycle to the building itself. It was important to the architects that this not serve to mimic but rather that it manifest itself as a three-dimensional response to the functional requirements of the stadium and its aesthetics and shape thus emerged directly from this process. The Velodrome contains 6,000 seats in both Olympic and Legacy Modes and embraces both contexts with minimal transformation.
The concrete upper and lower seating tiers are split by the public circulation concourse which allows spectators to maintain contact with the action on the track as they move around the building.
The design strategy focused on minimizing demand for energy and water and integrating this into the fabric of the building to reduce reliance on systems and infrastructure. The daylighting strategy applied to the main cycling arena exemplifies this approach.
Other notable features include high levels of insulation coupled with natural ventilation to reduce energy demand and rainwater harvesting which reduces potable water demand by 75% for the building.


OLYMPIC SHOOTING ARENAS

MAGMA ARCHITECTURE

Photos courtesy of Magma Architecture, Hufton+Crow, J.L. Diehl

OLYMPIC SHOOTING ARENAS

MAGMA ARCHITECTUREarchmarathonMAGMA ARCHITECTURE
Charlottenstrasse 95
10969 Berlin, Germany
www.magmaarchitecture.com
Category:
Sport
Project selected:
OLYMPIC SHOOTING ARENAS
Location:
London, England
Year:
2012

The three buildings comprise 3.800 seats divided between two partially enclosed ranges for the 25 and 10/50 m qualifying rounds and a fully enclosed finals range. Together they form a campus on the green field.
The design of the shooting venue was driven by the desire to evoke an experience of flow and precision inherent in the shooting sport through the dynamically curving space. All three ranges were configured in a crisp, white double curved membrane façade studded with vibrantly colored openings.
As well as animating the façade these dots operate as tensioning nodes that reduce the amount of required steel structure.
The fresh and light appearance of the buildings enhances the festive and celebrative character of the Olympic event.
All three of the venues are fully mobile, every joint has been designed so it can be reassembled; and no composite materials or adhesives were used.
After the event the buildings have be dismantled and sold to new owners. They will be reused in parts for the Glasgow for the 2014 Commonwealth Games, as equestrian hall and as part of a leisure center.