FOGO ISLAND LONG STUDIOS by Saunders Archtecture

SAUNDERS ARCHITECTURE


FOGO ISLAND LONG STUDIOS

SAUNDERS ARCHITECTUREarchmarathonSAUNDERS ARCHITECTURE
Vestre Torggate 22
5015 Bergen, Norway
www.saunders.no
Category:
Workspaces
Project selected:
FOGO ISLAND LONG STUDIOS
Location:
Fogo Island, Newfoundland, Canada
Year:
2010
Jury motivation
This project with 14 studios and one restaurant building demonstrates a high respect for the existing environment. It shows how architecture can foster economic and sustainable benefit in a way that is rooted in place. hows the validity of architecture to a long term social, economic and cultural commitment.

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The concept of the long studio responds to the transition of the seasons. The studio is organized in a linear from that consists of three different spaces. An open but covered area representing the spring marks the entrance to the studio and the beginning of the seasonal activity. The central portion is left open and mostly exposed to be fully immersed in all that is offered by the long summer days on Fogo Island. The end and main body of the studio is fully enclosed to provide an area of protection and solitude from the outside environment while still providing a connection to the landscape through a strategically framed view of the dramatic surrounding.
The long linear structure of this artist studio maximizes the amount of open wall and floor space. Large windows at either end and a skylight on the roof of the studio allows the maximum amount of natural light to flood the space. We have made one of the walls 1m deep to house storage, toilets and washbasins, with doors that are flush to the wall, thus avoiding any visual distraction inside the space.
The studios are placed on pillars at the end towards the sea, while the entrance area has a small concrete foundation for anchoring the construction to the landscape. With this type of construction, the studios can be placed in almost any place on the island. In addition, this allows for the studios to be pre-fabricated in a local workshop during the winter months, and then placed in the landscape in the spring.

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