Ft Architects

FT ARCHITECTS

FT-ARCHITECTS-archmarathon

Katsuya Fukushima
1968 Born in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan
1990 Graduated from Musashi Institute of Technology
1993 Completed the Master Course, Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music
1994~2002 Worked at Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects
2003 Started own studio, FT Architects
Hiroko Tominaga
1967 Born in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan
1990 Graduated from Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music
1992 Completed the Master Course, Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music
1992~2002 Worked at Hisao Kohyama Atelier
2003 Started own studio, FT Architects

fta.gotohp.jp


TIMBER STRUCTURE

FT ARCHITECTS

Photos courtesy of Shigeo Ogawa

TIMBER STRUCTURE

FT ARCHITECTSarchmarathonFT ARCHITECTS
5-22-3-305 Komazawa Setagaya-ku Tokyo, Japan
fta.gotohp.jp
Category:
Sport
Project selected:
TIMBER STRUCTURE
Location:
Tokyo, Japan
Year:
2013

The project consists of two buildings, an archery hall and a boxing club, standing a few hundred meters apart on the grounds of Kogakuin University in west Tokyo.
The University’s brief was for low-cost structures made of locally sourced timber to provide accessible and inspiring spaces for the students. By chance, both facilities called for a column-free space of 7.2m by 10.8m, a size that is comparable to a sacred hall in a traditional Japanese temple. In order to achieve this span, without columns and using low-cost methods of timber construction, it was necessary to come up with an innovative timber solution. We began the project by investigating a number of structural forms that would be appropriate for each sport.
Small timber sections, normally reserved for furniture making, were chosen for the archery hall, and timber members deemed defected because of insect damage, for the boxing club.
We have salvaged the purity of traditional Japanese timber composition, simply made up of horizontals and verticals, which has been somewhat disregarded ever since the advent of modernism in Japan.
The two structures have been constructed employing a simple, lo-tech method of bolt-and-nut assembly. However, due to the scale of the space and simplicity of construction, the execution had to be meticulous, in order to produce spaces that are out of the ordinary.