Hopkins Architects

HOPKINS ARCHITECTS

HOPKINS ARCHITECTS_archmarathon

Hopkins Architects have helped pioneer British architecture since our founding by Sir Michael Hopkins in 1976.
We have helped to deliver award-winning projects on three continents that have become recognized and beloved parts of the organizations for which they are designed. We are known for designing confidently and collaboratively in a manner, rather than a style, and as such have had success in many different design typologies. We produce buildings which combine progressive design, craft and sustainable solutions with rigorous cost and programme control to deliver projects of the highest architectural integrity.
We do not produce off-the-shelf, repetitive designs: each building is a specific expression and is integrally reflective of its place, environment and inhabitants.

Main projects:
Living Planet Centre, WWF-UK Headquarters, Woking, UK
London 2012 Velodrome, Stratford, UK
Princeton University: Frick Chemistry Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, USA
Yale University: Kroon Hall, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
British Antarctic Survey: Halley VI Research Station, Antarctica
Norwich Cathedral: Refectory and Hostry, Norwich, UK
Alnwick Garden Pavilion, Alnwick, UK
Bryanston School: Sanger Centre for Science and Mathematics, Dorset, UK
The Forum, Norwich, UK

www.hopkins.co.uk


LONDON VELODROME

HOPKINS ARCHITECTS

Photos courtesy of Richard Davies, Tom Jenkin, Anthony Palmer, Nathaniel Moore, Edmund Sumner, Olympic Delivery Authority, Janie Airey, Astrid Eckert

LONDON VELODROME

HOPKINS ARCHITECTSarchmarathonHOPKINS ARCHITECTS
27 Broadley Terrace
London NW1 6LG, England
www.hopkins.co.uk
Category:
Sport
Project selected:
LONDON VELODROME
Location:
London, England
Year:
2012

The 21,700m² Velodrome was inspired by the activity which takes place within its walls; from the beginning of the project Hopkins Architects wanted to apply the same level of design creativity and rigor of engineering that goes into a bicycle to the building itself. It was important to the architects that this not serve to mimic but rather that it manifest itself as a three-dimensional response to the functional requirements of the stadium and its aesthetics and shape thus emerged directly from this process. The Velodrome contains 6,000 seats in both Olympic and Legacy Modes and embraces both contexts with minimal transformation.
The concrete upper and lower seating tiers are split by the public circulation concourse which allows spectators to maintain contact with the action on the track as they move around the building.
The design strategy focused on minimizing demand for energy and water and integrating this into the fabric of the building to reduce reliance on systems and infrastructure. The daylighting strategy applied to the main cycling arena exemplifies this approach.
Other notable features include high levels of insulation coupled with natural ventilation to reduce energy demand and rainwater harvesting which reduces potable water demand by 75% for the building.