Project

RECONSTRUCTION OF NAHR EL BARED PALESTINE REFUGEE CAMP IN NORTHERN LEBANON

UNRWA

Photos courtesy of UNRWA

RECONSTRUCTION OF NAHR EL BARED PALESTINE REFUGEE CAMP IN NORTHERN LEBANON

UNRWAarchmarathonUNRWA
Bir Hassan, Beirut (opp. Sports City), Beirut 1107 2060, Lebanon
www.unrwa.org
Category:
Mixed Tenure Housing and Buildings
Project selected:
RECONSTRUCTION OF NAHR EL BARED PALESTINE REFUGEE CAMP IN NORTHERN LEBANON
Location:
Tripoli, Lebanon
Year:
2011

During 2007 clashes between the militant group Fatah Al-Islam and the Lebanese Armed Forces resulted in the destruction of Nahr el-Bared Camp (NBC) in Northern Lebanon.
The Vienna donor conference was held to mobilise funds for the reconstruction of the area: the aim of this project is to rebuild all of the former residences, commercial areas, UNRWA facilities, and infrastructure that existed in the camp prior to the crisis.
UNRWA has established the following objectives of the reconstruction process:
• The reconstruction of NBC, UNRWA Compound and of residential and non-residential units in the same neighborhood pattern as before, with common area improvements and infrastructural installations.
• The improvement of residential units from their previous formulation, allowing proper ventilation and open public space.
• The re-housing of all those Palestine refugee families who lived in the camp prior to its destruction in 2007.
• The reconstruction of the UNRWA Compound with its various services and installations at its former location adjacent to the sea.
To ensure that the reconstruction process included input from the local community, UNRWA enlisted the support of the Nahr el-Bared Reconstruction Commission for Civil Action and Studies (NBRC). After signing a Memorandum of Understanding with NBRC in mid-2008, NBRC volunteers and UNRWA architects began mapping every house as it existed in NBC prior to the conflict. This information became the basis of the reconstruction plan.


THULA FORT RESTORATION

ABDULLAH AL-HADRAMI

Photos courtesy of Abdullah Al-Hadrami

THULA FORT RESTORATION

ABDULLAH AL-HADRAMIarchmarathonABDULLAH AL-HADRAMI

Category:
Landscape and Public Spaces
Project selected:
THULA FORT RESTORATION
Location:
Thula, Amran, Yemen
Year:
2011

Thula is a small town fortified by a stone wall 1,162 meters in length and constructed of oblique, yellow sand stone. Twenty-six watch towers of varying shapes intersect the town wall, as well as four main gates. After the revolution of 1962, the town needed additional openings in the perimeter wall to access a road which had been recently built.
Urbanization was underway along the new road in the north east section of the old town until the project was realized in October 2003.
The goals of the project were to protect and save the numerous constructed and natural elements: agriculture terraces, catchments with traditional water channels, cisterns and burial sites. Additionally, the project sought to protect the cultural landscape, and to create jobs and provide local household income through the work of rehabilitating the large site.
During the rehabilitation work of the old stepped road from the lower gate, which was discovered in the course of project execution, to the upper gate of the fortress in 2009-2010, team members uncovered a complex of previously unknown buildings. The construction details show a gate with all of its annexes, towers, entry points with arches, pathways, walls, stairs and climbing passages. The rehabilitation and restoration project at least unlocks some of the mysteries of this historic site, expanding the world’s knowledge of the Sabaean kingdom and adding valuable information to the history of the ancient Arabia Felix and its rich cultural heritage.


JP-JETS VIP TERMINAL

ALNASSER + PARTNERS

Photos courtesy of Photo Hagop, Safwan Alnasser

JP-JETS VIP TERMINAL

ALNASSER + PARTNERSarchmarathonALNASSER + PARTNERS
Al Habaniyah St 18, 11195, Jordan
www.alnasserpartners.com
Category:
Transport
Project selected:
JP-JETS VIP TERMINAL
Location:
Aqab, Jordan
Year:
2012

The JP-Jets VIP terminal is a terminal for private jets built on a 10,000 m² piece of land in the coastal city of Aqaba in the south of Jordan. The project brief called for a built-up area of around 1,500 m² to accommodate a terminal with a receiving area, traveler lounges, and overnight accommodation for pilots, administrative facilities and services.
The project’s dynamic form evolved as a response to the surrounding context, producing a landmark building. The structure is composed of two contrasting masses; a glazed rectangular mass with a dramatic angular concrete skin wrapped around it. The rectangular mass, fully glazed and overlooking the airport apron and mountainous desert landscape, is related to the traveler and hence the more public elements of the building. Thus, it houses the lounges on the ground floor. The concrete skin, a two storey structure with slits of glazed openings, is related to the services and more private elements of the building.
The rectangular mass’s straight lines signify the patterns of human interventions in the desert area whilst the concrete skin’s sharp-edged surfaces reflect the rough lines of the mountains back dropping the project. The resulting structure is perceived as a sculptural landmark in the relatively rural landscape both from the air and on the ground.
With a form unprecedented in the surrounding context, the project required innovative, non-traditional methods of execution.


RING-ROAD

MODUS ARCHITECTS

Photos courtesy of Andrea Pertoldeo, Leonhard Angerer

RING-ROAD

MODUS ARCHITECTSarchmarathonMODUS ARCHITECTS
via Fallmerayer 7, 39042 Bressanone, Italy
www.modusarchitects.com
Category:
Transport
Project selected:
RING-ROAD
Location:
Bressanone – Varna, Italy
Year:
2012

The 5km long ring-road that bypasses the historic city-center of Bressanone was planned in an effort to avoid congestion, reduce pollution, and to facilitate access from the north to the light industrial area south of the town. The design brief called for a series of interventions (tunnel portals, retaining walls, acoustic barrier walls, service substations, mechanical structures, ventilation chimneys, and various signage elements) along the entire tract and is guided by two simple design decisions. Firstly, the above and below ground elements were conceptualized into a unified, consequential design approach and were calibrated to accommodate the peculiarities of the immediate site conditions. Secondly, the Bressanone and Varna tracts of the ring road were pulled together into one continuum whereby the two townships are no longer conceived as distinct contexts but rather two parts of a larger whole.
Research into the reconfiguration of commonly used materials in the road-building industry looked for new solutions to better address these environmental concerns while exploring new ways to put together very simple, low-cost materials that could bridge the gap in scale and overcome the difficulties in building in close proximity to the small scale buildings of Bressanone. The two-pronged chimney answers the technical requisites for the tunnel ventilation with a sculptural element.


CASA-PORT RAILWAY STATION

AREP

Photos courtesy of Didier Boy de La Tour, Christophe Iliou, Etienne Tricaud

CASA-PORT RAILWAY STATION

AREParchmarathonAREP
16 Avenue d’Ivry, 75647 - Paris cedex 13, France
www.arep.fr
Category:
Transport
Project selected:
CASA-PORT RAILWAY STATION
Location:
Casablanca, Morocco
Year:
2014

The construction of the new Casa-Port railway station is part of an overall urban remodelling plan for a district located on the edge of the port of Casablanca, linking the old city to the north of the urban area. The project is also designed to keep pace with the growth in rail traffic anticipated by Moroccan Railways (ONCF).
This transport hub comprises a large passenger hall opening onto a wide square to the south-west and the platforms to the south-east, a shopping centre located on the lower level of the hall, an underground car park on two levels, and an office building parallel to the platforms.
Taking into account the predominance of commuter travel and the simultaneous nature of peak traffic flows (incoming and outgoing), the passenger hall has been designed for full access to the platform concourse. The hall contains all the services required by travellers, including a prayer room away from bustle and noise. A wide central opening provides access to a lower level which will accommodate the shopping centre, food court areas, and the underground car park.
The architecture of the station hall is characterized by its roof, a wide canopy extending beyond the façades to jut out over the square, and its supporting columns, which open out at the top to allow light to enter the building through openings in the roof. On the west side, facing the city, a contemporary moucharaby system filters the strong afternoon sunlight without obstructing the view.

Project in collaboration with Groupe 3 Architectes.


ZGHARTA HOUSE

PLATAU | PLATFORM FOR ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM

Photos courtesy of Ieva Saudargaite

ZGHARTA HOUSE

PLATAU | PLATFORM FOR ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISMarchmarathonPLATAU | PLATFORM FOR ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM
P.O.Box 96, Jounieh 12002010, Lebanon
www.platau.info
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
ZGHARTA HOUSE
Location:
Zgharta, Lebanon
Year:
2012

Zgharta house sits in a Mediterranean olive grove. The site slopes gently to the main road, enjoying an unobstructed view of the agrarian landscape.
The house negotiates inclined topography by massing in two L-shaped horizontal levels that follow the natural terrain: The lower level comprises bedrooms, bathrooms, and technical spaces. The upper level is dedicated to the main living space, dining, kitchen and library. The extrusion of the two horizontal levels creates a third space, an outdoor courtyard which allows the landscape to slide throughout the house.
A u-shaped stone wall wraps diagonally around the two floors, creating an intense outer edge, and a serie of enclosed patios. In contrast, interiors are fully glazed, opening up to the privacy of the patios, courtyard and distant views.
The roof floats over the house with large cantilevers, bringing shade and privacy to the glazed living spaces below; blurring inside and outside.
From the street, the house is perceived as a succession of horizontal walls that fade out in the ground, inscribing the house in its larger geography while giving it privacy from the proximity of the road.
The southern orientation of the house allows for natural lighting, cross ventilation and passive cooling; canceling the need for air-conditioning during the long Mediterranean summer and benefiting from the optimum sun exposure during winter.


CASA G

FRANCESCO LIBRIZZI STUDIO

Photos courtesy of Alberto Moncada

CASA G

FRANCESCO LIBRIZZI STUDIOarchmarathonFRANCESCO LIBRIZZI STUDIO
Alzaia Naviglio Pavese 120, 20142 Milan, Italy
www.francescolibrizzi.com
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
CASA G
Location:
Cefalù, Italy
Year:
2014

“G House” is a project of renovation of a house in the old town of Cefalù, on the Tyrrhenian coast of Sicily. The house is a fusion of different units within the nucleus that formed the ancient fishing village overlooking the sea.
A major renovation was followed by a significant reinterpretation of space.
Old materials were processed with the help of local craftsmen to create a lively dialogue between tradition and modernity. The floors, for example, combine traditional and new design patterns in a continuous graphic flow that runs through all the rooms.
The rooftop terrace, open to a wonderful view of the sea, has certainly influenced the expectations of the client and the vocation of the space itself.
The distribution of the rooms on several levels, helped to identify a main path passing through the house with a unique stairway.
Divided on multiple stations at different altitudes, the staircase is the path to reach the view of the sea, while creating points of introspection on the interior spaces.
The frame is constituted by squared profiles in steel 14mm, which collaborate structurally with steps and risers made of self-supporting blocks of solid oak.
The floors are made of cement tiles hexagonal 20 cm and handmade traditional glazed ceramic tiles.


MOHAMMED VI FOOTBALL ACADEMY

GROUPE 3 ARCHITECTES

Photos courtesy of Stefano Berca

MOHAMMED VI FOOTBALL ACADEMY

GROUPE 3 ARCHITECTESarchmarathonGROUPE 3 ARCHITECTES
9, rue Gafsa – Hassan, 10 010 - Rabat, Morocco
www.groupe3architectes.com
Category:
Education
Project selected:
MOHAMMED VI FOOTBALL ACADEMY
Location:
Salé, Morocco
Year:
2010

Mohammed VI Football Academy is providing intensive football training and education courses to around fifty 13-to-18-year-olds, the Academy is designed to encourage both focus and a sense of community.
Its organization resembles a traditional Douar (hamlet), with a central ‘village square’ representing a place of meeting and exchange. Around this central square, stand five buildings accommodating a plethora of functions including administrative, sports, educational, housing and catering. Each of these buildings has a central landscaped patio for relaxation and intimacy.
While the buildings’ massive exteriors are painted in a sober white color, their respective patio walls are each painted with a distinct color reflective of a particular aspect of Morocco.
The extensive use of ochre earth, gravel, river stones, concrete paving and timber decking tie the complex to its environment.


EDGES APARTMENTS

STUDIO TOGGLE ARCHITECTS

Photos courtesy of Gijo Paul George

EDGES APARTMENTS

STUDIO TOGGLE ARCHITECTSarchmarathonSTUDIO TOGGLE ARCHITECTS
B2 Darwaza 51 Tower, Sharq, Kuwait City, Kuwait
www.studiotoggle.com
Category:
Mixed Tenure Housing and Buildings
Project selected:
EDGES APARTMENTS
Location:
Salmiya, Kuwait
Year:
2014

The ‘Edges Apartments’, with its articulated brick cladded façade, lights up one of the back-streets of the predominantly expat neighborhood of Salmiya, in Kuwait.
A simple rhythmic twist, achieved by transposition of the vertices on either side of a finite axis imparts dynamism and drama to the façade. A very restrained palette of locally sourced natural brick and exposed concrete finish further emphasizes the massing and gives the building its unique personality.
The challenge for the Architects was to give the building an instantly recognizable identity at the same time respecting an extremely restrictive budget. Functionality and serviceability were also as important. The building had to withstand the unforgiving summer heat of Kuwait made unbearable also by the occasional dust/sand storm.
The fired brick cladding acts as an effective thermal protection as well as being hardy enough, along with the exposed concrete finishes, to withstand the harsh desert climate. The major windows are recessed to block out the direct sun and Aluminum louvers are employed wherever possible to reduce the heat gain and the glare.
These small but calculated steps along with the rhythmic façade makes the Edges Apartments stand out amongst the rows of expat housing in the area.


H.S. HOUSE

SAHEL AL HIYARI ARCHITECTS

Photos courtesy of Sami Haven

H.S. HOUSE

SAHEL AL HIYARI ARCHITECTSarchmarathonSAHEL AL HIYARI ARCHITECTS
36 Al Shareef Al Hussein Bin Ali St., Jabal Amman - Zahran 11181, Jordan
www.sahelalhiyari.com
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
H.S. HOUSE
Location:
Amman, Jordan
Year:
2015

The site is located in the growing suburb of Dabouq to the north of Amman, renowned for its wealth of native oaks. It is a single family house built on a total site area of 1,981sq m. The project endeavors to create a dialogue between topography and architecture by its formal and spatial response to the sloping landscape. This relationship is characterized by organizing the plan of the house around one continuous movement that creates a rectangular shape with a centralized courtyard. One side resting on the ground and the other one is entirely elevated above the slope of the site. This condition creates an open, external room defined on one side by the landscape and on the other by a roof defined by the suspended upper floor. Accordingly, the house establishes a dialogue with its natural setting in terms of its spatial interim forming a sinuous movement with the topography. Moreover, its shape becomes a conduit for the prevailing winds that are allowed to permeate the structure. The sculptured condition of the design is further emphasised by the hand chiseled concrete material of the seamless surface, which allows the mass of the building to appear as a monolith.