Education Buildings

Case Western Reserve University, Tinkham Veale University Center

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Perkins+Will

Photos courtesy of Michelle Litvin Studio

Case Western Reserve University, Tinkham Veale University Center

Perkins+WillarchmarathonPerkins+Will
The Wrigley Building 410 North Michigan Avenue Suite 1600 Chicago, IL 60611
www.perkinswill.com
Category:
Education Buildings
Project selected:
Case Western Reserve University, Tinkham Veale University Center
Location:
Cleveland, Ohio
Year:
2015

Located in the center of three separately defined campus zones at Case Western Reserve University the new university center contains student gathering spaces, dining facilities, meeting rooms, and offices for student organizations. The new building features three wings that are designed to facilitate the convergence of students from all three zones and serve as a connection point to tie the entire campus together.
The site is adjacent to a large open field, which sits atop a two-story underground parking structure. Construction was prohibited on the field above the garage due to insufficient structure and high hydrostatic pressure. The two sides adjacent to the field and underground parking structure are cantilevered over the garage to avoid these structural complications and to maximize floor plate sizes.
The structure of the facility was designed as a folded plate of green roofs growing out of the site with glazed walls below that open views to the outdoors. At the intersection of the three wings is a double-height gathering space uniting the two floors of the facility. A two-story high double-glazed wall encloses this space and opens western views into the field and an art museum beyond while eliminating excessive heat loads.

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Learning Hub

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Heatherwick Studio

Photos courtesy of Hufton and Crow

Learning Hub

Heatherwick StudioarchmarathonHeatherwick Studio
356-364 Gray’s Inn Road London WC1X 8BH
www.heatherwick.com
Category:
Education Buildings
Project selected:
Learning Hub
Location:
Singapore
Year:
2015

The studio was asked by Nanyang Technological University in Singapore to design a building suited to the needs of students in the 21st century.
With so much information available on the internet, the university recognised the need to redefine the physical space of the university now that it is no longer the sole repository of knowledge. The studio understood the contemporary university to be a space for meeting people, and designed a building to facilitate that as much as possible.
The Learning Hub opened in March 2015. It is composed of twelve towers, each a stack of corner-less classrooms intended to foster collaborative learning. The towers are arranged around a central atrium space, which provides sunlight, visibility, and a sense of openness. This interweaving of social and learning spaces creates a dynamic environment and encourages interaction between students and professors.
The studio kept construction costs down with a series of re-usable silicon moulds that add variety and shape to the concrete. The columns, for example, have an undulating surface that makes them more tactile. To make each facade panel unique, the studio developed a modular system in which rubber strips of different sizes could be inserted and removed; the panels were then curved in ten different gradations to clad the rounded classrooms. A third set of moulds were used on the interior wall panels, which were pigmented and embedded with 700 drawings by the illustrator Sara Fanelli.
The Learning Hub’s environmental credentials earned it Green Mark Platinum status, the highest environmental rating in Singapore.

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The Pinch: library and community center

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John Lin and Olivier Ottevaere

Photo courtesy of John Lin and Olivier Ottevaere

The Pinch: library and community center

John Lin and Olivier OttevaerearchmarathonJohn Lin and Olivier Ottevaere
Rural Urban Framework Room 406 Knowles Building The Faculty of Architecture The University of Hong Kong Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong
www.rufwork.org
www.doubleostudio.com
Category:
Education Buildings
Project selected:
The Pinch: library and community center
Location:
Shuanghe Village, Yunnan Province, China
Year:
2014

The Pinch is a library and community center in Shuanghe Village, Yunnan Province, China. The project is part of a government led reconstruction effort after an earthquake in Sept 2012. The majority of village houses were destroyed, leaving the residents living in tents for up to one year. After the earthquake the government has sponsored new concrete and brick houses and a large central plaza. During the first site visit, the houses remained incomplete and the plaza was a large empty site.
The University of Hong Kong decided to sponsor the design and implementation of a new library building. Located in the new but empty public plaza, it would serve to activate the community and provide a physical memorial for the event. The site of the library is against a 4 meter high retaining wall. The design spans across this level difference and acts as a bridge between the rebuilt village and the new memorial plaza. Emphasizing its location in a remote mountain valley, the design responds visually to the space of the valley, offering stunning views across a dramatic double curved roof. The structure itself rises to a peak, a monument to the earthquake and rebuilding effort.
As a Knowledge Exchange Project, the construction involves collaboration with a local timber manufacturing factory. The process resulted in the development of a surprisingly diverse form through simple means. A series of trusses is anchored between the upper road level and lower plaza level. The form of each truss changes to create both a gradual incline (to bring people down) and then a sharp upward pitch (to elevate the roof). The trusses were covered in an aluminium waterproofing layer and timber decking. On the interior, the trusses extend downward to support a floating bookshelf. Simple traditional school benches are used as chairs. The polycarbonate doors can open to create a completely open space extending out to the plaza.
Rather than submitting to the abandonment of wood construction (as with the houses after the earthquake), the project reasserts the ability to build contemporary timber structures in remote areas of China.

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Baan Nong Bua School

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Junsekino Architect and Design

Photos courtesy of Spaceshift Studio

Baan Nong Bua School

Junsekino Architect and DesignarchmarathonJunsekino Architect and Design
126/56 2nd Floor Soi Watcharapol Moo 8 Ramindra Rd. Tharang Bangkhen Bangkok 10230
www.junsekino.com
Category:
Education Buildings
Project selected:
Baan Nong Bua School
Location:
Chiang Rai, Thailand
Year:
2015

From the earthquake disaster in the northern part of Thailand, Chiang Rai province, on the 5th May in 2014…
Baan Nong Bua School, the local school which provides the elementary education for the children whose age ranged from 5 to 10 years old, has also been affected by this natural disaster. The school’s building which was damaged is considered to possess the same standard and pattern with other schools in Thailand; however, this pattern does not brace for the severe natural disasters. Due to the dilapidation of the building, the students were beseeched to study in the temporary pavilion which is not suitable for learning. Nevertheless, the school had not received enough budgets to cope with this circumstance; consequently, the possibility for the new building seems to be faint.
Design for Disasters (D4D) was the first group to enter the affected area in order to collect the data. Moreover, the organization has also invited 9 architects, who voluntarily give assistance to the project, The Association of Siamese Architects under Royal Patronage, The Engineering Institute of Thailand under H.M. the King’s Patronage, and other related institutes and medias. In addition, the personage who has subsidized the project by the donation money is Venerable V. Vajiramedhi; consequently, Baan Nong Bua Pordee Pordee School was initiated.
The school has requested for 4 classrooms with the utility space of 48 square meters; moreover, the central space is also required so the children can have their activity space. Additionally, the modular of the donated material utilization in the dry construction process is ideally managed in order to avoid the construction remainders. The structure of the building is mainly made by steel according to the principal condition that we had proposed since the steel structure would represent the flexible skeletal frame and this unrigid structure can also absorb the vibration when earthquakes occur. Besides, the steel structure can be constructed facilely and promptly in rural areas.
The walls of the building are composed of the modular system of wood cement boards which are widely available and handy. These wood cement boards can be used in constructing the walls as well as the shelves; therefore, the number of the construction remainders are subsequently decreased. However, the most significant concept is the developable design for the real users; students and teachers. For years to come, the users can adjust the functions according to their own demand; for instance, the classrooms can be integrated by the diminution of the partitions between 2 floors or the restoration of the building’s surface by using local material such as bamboo in order to facilitate the process of quality control; moreover, bamboo also has the flexibility which is suitable in case of earthquakes. Besides, the utilization of bamboo in the restoration of the building’s surface is facile for the calculation, transportation and construction.
The building is designed to correspond with the weather condition of the northern part of Thailand which allows the circulation of natural air, and the penetration of natural light into the building. The characteristics of the building are required to be thin and light. Besides, the building is demanded to have pavilion-like appearance in correspondence with the rural architecture in which the ceiling is elevated in order to allow the natural light to penetrate through the classrooms during daytime, the air can freely circulate, the humidity in the rooms is reduced and the floor is also elevated in case of flooding. Furthermore, there is also the space for keeping the shoes according to Thai culture which requires the guests to take off their shoes before entering the main building. The Veranda, thus, is the semi indoor outdoor space which is appropriated for Thai culture and weather condition. The extended eaves can be provided as the weather shield; however, the air can also pass through the building facilely. Additionally, the number of the pillars and other components has also been diminished since the building is constructed by using the benevolence.
Finally, this education building is the architecture which is constructed through the cooperation of every folks in the locality; therefore, no one is in charge of possessing this building since it is the outcome of all locals’ spirit. Eventually, Baan Nong Bua Pordee Pordee School Project is considered to be the model of the public building which is appropriated for current circumstance of Thailand; it is good to be sufficient, Pordee Pordee.

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