Private housing

Hyunam

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IROJE Architects&Planners

Photo courtesy of Jong Oh Kim

Hyunam

IROJE Architects&PlannersarchmarathonIROJE Architects&Planners
2-8 dongsung-dong, jongro-gu, seoul 110-809 korea
www.iroje.com
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
Hyunam
Location:
Gunwi-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do, korea
Year:
2014

The client, who built Moheon in Daegu, launched a plan to transform 992,000m2 of mountainous land in Gunwi into a natural botanical park. For a long time, the client had been transplanting and cultivating trees and observing the changes in the area. The client wanted the entire botanical garden as a space of introspection. He also wanted a small residence within the park.
The house is located in the heart of the park where only the mountains and the sky are visible. In the thick fir tree forest, five small man-made ponds were created as a prelude along the road leading to the house. Passing the ponds, you encounter a long, straight, Corten steel structure. Above it, lies a hill, and below, a valley. If you open the door, having no idea of what will happen at all, you will find nature’s landscape spread out in magnificent fashion. The building connects the ground to the sky, but here, the ground disappears. There is only you, nature, and silence. Facing west, the sun sets over the reservoir in front. You come out of the house, climb the hill, and sit on the cold Corten steel chair on the silver grass. You become a part of nature. It is a time of complete solitude, a time for thought. That is why the house is named Hyunam, a humble black house.

(ratings closed)



A house for Oiso

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DGT. Dorell.Ghotmeh.Tane / Architects

Photos courtesy of Takumi Ota

A house for Oiso

DGT. Dorell.Ghotmeh.Tane / ArchitectsarchmarathonDGT. Dorell.Ghotmeh.Tane / Architects
75 rue de la Fontaine au Roi 75011 Paris, France
www.dgtarchitects.com
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
A house for Oiso
Location:
Oiso, Japan
Year:
2015

Our client decided to be a resident of Oiso.
Oiso, far from the city – around one hour away, is located in-between the sea and the mountains, with a population of around 32,000 people.
“I would like you to design a house that will remain after 100 years.” – that was the first request by our client. Oiso is a place that retains the trail left by the inhabitants from over five thousand years ago. It is the land in which ancient people lived, who selected the warm climate from the huge island that is Japan. Over time, the trail of various eras remained, from the Yayoi period (B.C. 4 – 4C) to the modern age through to the Edo period (17C – middle of 19C). The people of Oiso experimented with many different forms of housing, such as pit-dwellings, raised-floor dwellings, dug-standing pillar buildings, machiya (traditional merchant houses), architecture of villa and so on. Then we got one idea: we want to design a ‘Japanese House’ of the living form, which captures the essence of Japan from all ages.
In ‘A house for Oiso’, we used the ‘soil colour’ for the floor of the ground level and the walls. Having excavated the building 60 centimetres more than the surface of the foothold, we reused the remaining soil as a finishing material. The soil performs highly as a building material, with hygroscopic and heat-insulation properties. The building being buried inside the ground allows the soil to keep the cool temperature in summer, and warm the floor surface with regenerating radiation floor heating in winter. The second floor is the integrated space of ‘the wood colour’ covering the floor, the wall and the ceiling. We planned the circulation of the air to prevent the wind and rain, and to mitigate the humidity.

(ratings closed)



Saigon house

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a21studio

Photos courtesy of Quang Tran, Hiroyuki Oki

Saigon house

a21studioarchmarathona21studio
2/10 Nguyễn Huy Lượng, ward 14, Bình Thạnh district, Hochiminh city, Vietnam
www.a21studio.com.vn
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
Saigon house
Location:
Hồ Chí Minh city, Vietnam
Year:
2015

In Saigon, there is a story about Van Duong Phu, a masterpiece of architecture, built by Mr. Vuong Hong Sen, a culturist, an academic, and a famous collector of antiques. Moreover, he also has a deep knowledge of southern Vietnam and wrote many books about Saigon.
At the end of his life, he would have liked to dedicate his house as a museum in order to prevent the antiques from being stolen and introduce Saigon culture to visitors.
However, after his death, the house has been abandoned, and the spirit is totally lost.
We’ve recognized that although being respected and successful in his works, he failed in passing his love to his family. Therefore, they do not respect their childhood.

(ratings closed)



Villa T

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YTAA – Youssef Tohme Architects and Associates

Photo courtesy of Iwan Baan and Ieva Saudargaite

Villa T

YTAA - Youssef Tohme Architects and AssociatesarchmarathonYTAA - Youssef Tohme Architects and Associates
Beirut, Karantina Kamel Building, 4th Floor, Lebanon
www.yousseftohme.com
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
Villa T
Location:
Kornet Chehouane, Lebanon
Year:
2015

Perched on a steep rocky slope in an area distinguished by its pine forest and captivating views of Beirut and the sea, this house is almost invisible at surface level. It offers no impression of itself. With little reference to scale and few walls, it challenges the notion of boundaries and norms in domestic space. Layered, it consists of three flowing expanses of inhabitable concrete.
These superposed cantilevered floors support the various elements of the brief, which are tied together by an internal ramp running through the villa. The open floors are presented as horizontal incisions that lend a certain structure to the rugged surroundings. Spacious inside, the cantilevered villa projects itself into empty space. Provocative, it surprises inhabitants with its interpretation of the landscape. With no outer skin, no envelope, it seems no more than an interior, all the more stunning for the way it creates apparently seamless interaction with the exterior.
Villa T shrugs off its surroundings. It seems to challenge the sense of dimensions and the relationship of architecture or space with its environment. It is as though in seeking to erase any impression of tethering, the house allows its inhabitants to live each day differently, if only because its 50-meter glass façade obliges them to live with the simultaneous impressions of a sense of security (interior) and of threat (exteriors).

(ratings closed)



ALPS Villa

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Camillo Botticini Architect

Photos courtesy of Niccolò Galeazzi

ALPS Villa

Camillo Botticini ArchitectarchmarathonCamillo Botticini Architect
via saleri 18, 25135 Brescia, Italy
www.botticini-arch.com
Category:
Private housing
Project selected:
ALPS Villa
Location:
Brescia, Italy
Year:
2014

The house stands on a clearing amidst trees, 700 meters above the sea level, close to the “Passo del Cavallo”, still close to the urban noise but at the same time far away.
The relationship with the ground and the landscape are the material that construct the project: the ground by communicating with the project operates a principle of “rootedness” into the slope to the north, where the house seems to bite the mountain, and the principle of “emancipation” to the south, with an overhang that throws the structure to the valley.
The house has an irregular plan shaped like a “C” with a patio where the fourth side is made from a green plane that delivers the planimetric structure that generates the spaces of the house, creating three bodies with variable height increasing from north-west, where the volume disappears by integrating into the ground.
The house is environmentally friendly in the building materials and insulation, equipped with ventilated walls, a sustainable home in the settlement balance with the landscape. Green meadows and trees framing the outer coating in corrugated oxide copper and Accoya wood, elements that, with the triple room glass, are the artifice in counterpoint that interacts with nature.
The ventilated wall copper is modulated with a slight pleating to vibrate the light on the non-reflecting surface.
The wood of the great splay reflects light that is refracted from the south. The flooring of the patio is made in iroko wood meanwhile the large windows are integrated into the copper coating, real material around which the house is oriented. Inside the floors are made of sand-colored resin, the walls are in plasterboard painted white and ceilings with recessed lights in the graft cut from the slab-wall, parapets are in glass and the windows are made of painted iron.

(ratings closed)