Labics

Labics

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Labics is an office of architecture and urban planning founded in Rome in 2002 by Maria Claudia Clemente and Francesco Isidori. Combining the theoretical approach with applied research, the field of interest of the office extends from interior design to the scale of urban masterplans, going through the different scales and complexities of the project. The name of the practice – Labics – expresses the concept of a laboratory, a testing ground for advanced ideas. Theoretical research and its practical applications form an integral and important part of the practice’s work.
The research conducted at Labics is geared towards an architecture open, relational and structured, capable of guiding the transformation of a context and of a territory, experiencing different relation with the context and defining new social and urban geographies.
Labics has won several national and international competitions, among which we must remember the MAST in Bologna (2006) and “Città del Sole” in Rome (2007). Among the urban projects has to be mentioned the New Urban Center of Torrespaccata in Rome, currently under development. Since 2003 to 2014 the practice has been responsible for the general concept, interior design and architecture of Obikà, an international chain of bars and restaurants specialising in Italian food located in Milan, Rome, London, Florence, New- York, Tokyo, and Kuwait City.
Labics has been invited to exhibit in different exhibitions among which it has to be mentioned the 11°, 12° and 14° Architecture Biennale in Venezia. Most of the projects have been published in national and international magazines.

Main projects:
– Città del Sole, Rome, Italy – 2015
– Restaurant Mamma Mia, Rome, Italy – 2015
– Credito di Romagna, Rome, Italy – 2015
– Obikà Broadway, New York – 2014
– Multifunctional building G.D, Bologna, Italy – 2013
– Obikà South Kensington, London, UK – 2012
– Fontana square in Quinto de Stampi, Rozzano, Milan, Italy – 2011
– Walkway at Trajan’s Forum, Rome, Italy – 2004
– Canyon House, Rome, Italy – 2004
– Italpromo & Libardi associati headquarters, Rome, Italy – 2004
– Roman Tabernae at the Trajan’s Forum, Rome, Italy – 2003
– Podere 43, Albinia, Grosseto, Italy – 2002

Work in progress:
– Masterplan Wuhu, Anhui, China
– Scalo San Lorenzo, Rome, Italy
– Housing masterplan Le Serre, Tirane, Albania
– Torrespaccata Masterplan, Rome, Italy
– Maggiore General Hospital in Milan, Milan, Italy
– Temporary Pavillion, Milan, Italy
– Olive oil Mill, Seggiano, Italy
– Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy

Project selected for Archmarathon: Città del Sole



Città del Sole

Ci spiace, ma questo articolo è disponibile soltanto in Inglese Americano. Per ragioni di convenienza del visitatore, il contenuto è mostrato sotto nella lingua alternativa. Puoi cliccare sul link per cambiare la lingua attiva.

Labics

Photos courtesy of Fernando Guerra

Città del Sole

LabicsarchmarathonLabics
Via Ennio Quirino Visconti, 11 Roma, Italy
www.labics.it
Category:
Mixed Tenure Housing & Buildings
Project selected:
Città del Sole
Location:
Rome, Italy
Year:
2015

Winning competition entry for the redevelopment of an urban area, including the transformation of an existing bus depot to integrate a mixture of uses including office, retail space and residential units.
This project is part of the Municipality of Rome’s initiative to redevelop a number of transport depots within the city in conjunction with local public transport authority ATAC. It involves the regeneration of a neighbourhood with a weak identity but with good growth potential due to its location at the edge of the city centre. Labics’ aim therefore was to create a new centre for the local community, but also to increase its profile as a place of transition with privileged access to the city centre.
The development of the site has been designed to be porous, allowing good access to and from the site, encouraging the flow of people and demonstrating Labics’ philosophy that cities should be built around systems rather than as a series of objects. Public realm space is not seen as residual but is fully integrated with the built elements – so, for example, the basement space becomes the load-bearing structure for high level walkways as well as a pathway in itself. This creates a complex public space, rich in experience.
The project is articulated over different levels, with commercial activities and the public library at ground level, offices on the first floor and public spaces on top of those. Three buildings are suspended above this public area – one containing more offices and the other two for residential use. The residential buildings contrast in terms of their typology and external treatment. The first is a tower containing small and medium-sized flats, partially enclosed with a horizontal glass brise soleil. The second ‘villa’ building contains luxury duplex apartments and is clad with aluminium panels that provide flexible, adjustable sun shading and a playful, ever-changing envelope.

(ratings closed)